RARE WEDGWOOD "Ruby Tonquin" VASE

CHANNEL MODERN THE HOLD RUBY TONQUIN VASE.jpg
CHANNEL MODERN THE HOLD RUBY TONQUIN VASE 1.jpg
CHANNEL MODERN THE HOLD RUBY TONQUIN VASE 2.jpg
CHANNEL MODERN THE HOLD RUBY TONQUIN VASE 3.jpg
CHANNEL MODERN THE HOLD RUBY TONQUIN VASE.jpg
CHANNEL MODERN THE HOLD RUBY TONQUIN VASE 1.jpg
CHANNEL MODERN THE HOLD RUBY TONQUIN VASE 2.jpg
CHANNEL MODERN THE HOLD RUBY TONQUIN VASE 3.jpg
sold out

RARE WEDGWOOD "Ruby Tonquin" VASE

1,050.00

It’s incredibly fascinating to hold in your hands perhaps one of the most beautiful, unique and rare bone china items ever produced by the historic and world renowned Wedgwood factory. Ruby Tonquin specifically is entirely hand painted and fired in ovens at least seven times! Nature amplified one thousand percent.

This design pattern was inspired by the town of Xiaolan in the Jiangsu province in China, known as the City of Chrysanthemums. Incredible attention to hand finished detail and the dizzying amount of precise application and finishing processes required to produce it. Regardless of whether you’re a fan of neo-classical design or not, there is no denying this is something very special for any enthusiast of the beautiful craftsmanship and history of hand made goods production in England.

To see these items being produced, please watch this fantastic video from 1958.

Quote below from the Wedgwood museum:

“Tonquin as a pattern has its origins in the 19th century, circa 1830, when it appeared on earthenware bodies. John Edward Goodwin (1867-1949) was an Art Director at Wedgwood and was responsible for designing some of the most famous Wedgwood patterns including 'Ruby Tonquin' (1930), and 'Ulander' (1912). Ruby Tonquin first appeared in 1930 under pattern number W2488 , and was utilised on dinner and tea ware. In the 20th century Tonquin was revived as specific design for bone china in a variety of colour combinations and background finishes, by Victor Skellern. Skellern worked under John Edward Goodwin in the Design department and later in 1934 took over from Goodwin. The Wedgwood Review vol6 No12 of Dec 1976 references two new designs created for the China & Glass exhibition in Harrods, those patterns being black and gold and green and gold. Both Ruby and Black Tonquin patterns were discontinued in 1994.”

Condition: Used condition. One tiny surface hairline inside the neck, not seen from exterior.

Add To Cart